Babysitter Registry

The City Park Community Association will once again be offering a community-based babysitter registry to serve the needs of young families living in the area.

The City Park Community Association will once again be offering a community-based babysitter registry to serve the needs of young families living in the area.

If you are a babysitter and would like to get your name on the registry, please submit your name, age and phone number to janicelbraden@gmail.com. For anyone under the age of 18, please provide the name and phone number of a guardian to confirm consent. Also, indicate if you have babysitter course training, preferred ages, availability times and any other information you would like potential families to know.

If you want a copy of the babysitter list, contact Janice Braden at 653-1888 or janicelbraden@gmail.com.

Photo: Aquilla/Flickr

The Potato Patch

City Park has been home to “The Potato Patch” — a garden for the Food Bank — for the past two summers. Oct. 11 saw the last of this year’s crop harvested and delivered to the Food Bank larder.

By Larry Mullen, Food Bank Garden Coordinator

City Park has been home to “The Potato Patch,” a garden for the Food Bank, for the past two summers. Oct. 11 saw the last of this year’s crop harvested and delivered to the Food Bank larder.

Located on the half city block off 3rd. Avenue, between Duke and Duchess, and surrounded by a blue wire fence, the land was worked by volunteers and Food Bank staff to produce an abundant supply of fresh vegetables. The weeds threatened to defeat us during the long, hot days of July and early August — but volunteer workers prevailed. In early October, over a 6 day period, we dug up 6,180 lbs. of carrots. Earlier in the season the potato, beet, cabbage and onion crops yielded just over 9,000 lbs.

The crowning results, however, came from the stand of corn. On just under one third of an acre we picked 5,800 ears. This amount exceeds the 5 year provincial average! Thank you to Dave Hiebert for planting the idea, last fall, to grow corn.

There are a great many others to thank for this successful project. Most importantly, Keith and Carla Lysyshyn, living on 4th. Ave., provided access to their water. Without this generous supply we would not have had the yields we did. Several people from City Park and surrounding neighbourhoods came forward to lend a hand at important junctures.

The workers from Urban Camp, Teen Challenge, and Sask.Tel Pioneers were once again main stays. Wally, from Wally’s Urban Market Garden, whom many City Parkers know from his stall at the Farmers’ Market, provided inspired hands-on help several times during the summer.

Potato Patch

Critical to our success were staff, clientele, and volunteers from the Food Bank along with volunteer gardeners from Circle Drive Alliance Church who came at a crucial time. Ben Marlanovits, the horticulturist from the Core Neighbourhood Co-op, was also much appreciated for his assistance.

The final push to harvest all those carrots was provided by students via the Learning Centre and the Aboriginal Students’ Centre at the U of S. Also contributing from the University was Professor Doug Waterer and his staff from the Department of Plant Science, who provided invaluable work and consultation throughout the year. Welcome aboard and thanks also to the people newly involved from the Department of Soil Science.

Thanks to the reliable Ernie Fast who returned for year two with his cultivating equipment; to Rob Ferguson, owner of Super Save Fencing, for all his material help; to Ruth Anne and Robin from CHEP for their consultations, and to the Sask. Waste Reduction Council for volunteer help at another crucial time.

Hats off to Mayor Don Atcheson for his enthusiastic on-going support and to all the City Councillors who voted in favour of having the garden continue this past year.

Also thanks to Milt Taylor, owner of Imagery Photography on Duchess, inspired the project and provided necessary fund-raising support, bringing in money and in-kind contributions. In return we provided him with vegetables rather than half a city block of weeds. His enthusiastic interest helped make it all fun.

One final note: throughout this report I have used the words “critical” and “crucial” to describe times when the weeds were swamping us and/or the produce was ripe and ready for harvesting immediately if not sooner. Those of you who garden will appreciate how crucial it is to get help at these critical times! Half a city block is a lot of land to be responsible for, but everyone is already looking forward to 2012.

Photo: mellowynk/Flickr

Citizen Patrol

The Citizen Patrol Program is a city-wide campaign — led by the Saskatoon Police Service — to rally volunteers to be the “eyes and ears” for police, in an attempt to deter criminal activity.

The Citizen Patrol Program is a city-wide campaign — led by the Saskatoon Police Service — to rally volunteers to be the “eyes and ears” for police, in an attempt to deter criminal activity.

According to the Saskatoon Police Service website, citizen patrol volunteers bring a positive visable presence to the neighbourhood and have “firsthand knowledge of who does and doesn’t live” in a certain community.

The program organizes groups of volunteers and provides brief police instruction on how to document suspicious behavior.

As of now, City Park does not run a Citizen Patrol Program. However, John Ng has stepped up and is looking for enthusiastic, responsible and caring people to join him in volunteering for the program.

You can volunteer as much time as you can afford. Working in teams, volunteers either bike, jog or drive around the neighbourhood wearing vests, usings flashlights and cell phones.

To read more, go to the official Saskatoon Police Service website located at http://www.police.saskatoon.sk.ca, select Programs and Services along the left hand tab, and choose the first drop-down option “Citizen Patrol.”

To participate contact your local Citizen Patrol coordinator John Ng at johnathan.ng@gmail.com or Constable Weins/Sergeant McAvoy at 975-2265.

Photo: Saskatoon Police

Kinsmen Park and Area Masterplan

Plans to overhaul Saskatoon’s oldest and most renowned park have been given the green light by city council, with work expected to begin in roughly one year.

Plans to overhaul Saskatoon’s oldest and most renowned park have been given the green light by city council, with work expected to begin in roughly one year.

The move comes after several months of stakeholder workshops and two open houses where city planners and park architects encouraged the public to provide feedback.

The design, says the city, incorporates seven main features which not only account for Kinsmen Park, but also the re-use of the Mendel Gallery Building.

The main features — which are split between a five-year plan, 10-year plan and 25 year plan — include new rides and childrens’ play areas, character improvement of Spadina Crescent, riverbank rehabilitation, improved and upgraded trails, Mendel integration, substantial increases to winter amenities and cultural and historical awareness.

Kinsmen Park landbridge

The centerpiece of the park will be the childrens’ play area, which will include two new rides, a new train and an expanded train route.

Jeanna South, Kinsmen Park and Area master plan project leader, said the feedback they received was very positive about keeping the area family oriented. According to designs, the park will have water play, nature play, youth play and play for young children.

To ensure safety, Spadina Crescent will be redesigned, in the long-term, to be a slow-traffic, tree-lined, promenade with a roundabout just before the University Bridge intersection.

For the Winter, the city plans to promote the area as a hub for cold weather activities. During the design phase, members of the Saskatoon Nordic ski community worked closely with the city on maintaining and improving current trails. The blueprint also shows a tobogganing mound, an ice skating path and a winterized concession.

UPDATE: the Kinsmen Park and Area Masterplan wins national design award March 5. Read more here

Click here to view the summer program plan.

Click here to view the winter program plan.

Click here for more details from the City of Saskatoon website.

Graphics: City of Saskatoon

Saskatchewan Party and NDP split City Park

For the first time since 1991, City Park residents are being represented by a provincial political party other than the New Democrats.

Roger Parent of Sask. Party defeats incumbent MLA Frank Quennell in Saskatoon Meewasin; former teacher and incumbent NDP candidate David Forbes holds on to Saskatoon Centre.

For the first time since 1991, City Park residents are being represented by a provincial political party other than the New Democrats.

On Nov. 7, Saskatchewan Party candidate Roger Parent beat out two-time incumbent Frank Quennell, capturing 54 per cent of the popular vote compared to Quennell’s 42 per cent in the district of Saskatoon Meewasin.

The Saskatoon Meewasin riding currently includes the urban neighbourhoods of River Heights, Richmond Heights, North Park, Mayfair, Kelsey-Woodlawn and everything north of Queen Street in City Park. Quennell was elected MLA in 2003, when he took over the widely considered NDP stronghold from Carolyn Jones, who succeeded Carol Teichrob, also of the NDP.

The last time this particular region of Saskatoon was not held by the NDP was from 1986 to 1991, when Ray Meiklejohn of the Progressive Conservatives represented what was then the constituency of Saskatoon Mayfair.

Leading up to the Nov. 7 election, the province largely expected a Sask. Party landslide, however, collecting 49 of the possible 58 seats surprised even the cockiest of conservatives. In urban constituencies across Saskatchewan, the Sask. Party made substantial gains.

Due to both the crumbling of the Liberal Party of Saskatchewan, and the flimsy platform and poor leadership of the NDP, voters overwhelmingly bought in to the Sask. Party who promised to work on maintaining strong economic times for the province.

“Premier Wall has done an excellent job with the growth agenda for this province. We are forecasted to lead the nation in economic growth, we have the lowest unemployment in the country and we have a premier who stands up for us on critical issues, like health care and potash,” said Parent, on the Sask. Party’s website.

Parent has lived in Saskatoon Meewasin and is a graduate of SIAST in mechanical engineering technology and has a business administration certificate from the University of Saskatchewan.

According to SaskParty.com, “He has been involved with several initiatives within the community, including the Saskatoon Homelessness Initiative Partnership, sitting on the board of directors for the Saskatchewan Economic Development Association and most recently as a board member for the Saskatchewan Housing Corporation.”

Meanwhile, in Saskatoon Centre, which includes much of Saskatoon’s downtown core along with City Park, from 25th Street to Queen Street, incumbent David Forbes was one of the eight NDP candidates to win their race.

Forbes, a former school teacher, received 54 per cent of the popular vote, although the young Sask. Party newcomer David Cooper gave Forbes a good fight pulling 43 per cent of the vote.

This is Forbes’ third term representing Saskatoon Centre after first being elected in 2003. Under Lorne Calvert he served as Minister of Labour, and now he chairs the NDP caucus, as well as serves as the opposition critic for Labour, Municipal Affairs and Housing.

Photo: supplied